Month: May 2016

12 Keys for Thought-Leadership Effectiveness

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAedAAAAJGQzYTM4NmI3LTkyZTctNDYwMC1hNGU1LThhZDUyNjUwYWU5NwThought leadership is a communications and marketing strategy (and tactic, for that matter) that companies, organizations and individuals have utilized to varying degrees of success for decades. Our nation’s founding fathers, in particular, even used an 18th century delivery system – the pamphlet – to extol ideas (and, in some cases, to engage in character assassination).

The strategy also is one of those concepts that everyone in an organization typically believes he or she understands completely and can easily “bang out” without much planning or, interestingly enough, actual “thought.” That belief, of course, sits right at the top of the list of most-common mistakes made when putting a though-leadership program together.

Setting that one aside for now, here are 12 other keys to ensuring your thought-leadership program is interesting, on the mark and effective.

  • Start curious/inspire curiosity. We want to expand the conversation, correct? We do that by expanding the conversation – and the thinking – right at the beginning of the process. Don’t begin “topic-mining” by assuming you already know everything about a particular subject. If you begin curious in developing your points of view you will inspire your readers to be curious as well. Elevate.  Make them think, encourage them to learn.
  • “I” comes before “M.” OK, OK. Sometimes it’s just alphabetical. Thought leadership is about ideas. It’s not about marketing. Present the way you think, how you view situations, how you go about creating solutions. Don’t try to directly sell business. The business will accrue to you if your ideas leave the desired impression.
  • Answer questions. Don’t know where to start? Think you don’t really have any unique ideas or points of view. The following will kick start your creative thinking: What are the questions your clients have been asking? What are the questions you wish they would ask because you have some great ideas? What are the questions you are scared to death they will ask and you don’t have answers? What are the questions they are answering for you because you haven’t been timely in getting your message out?
  • Focus on narrow/narrow your focus. There is nothing inherently wrong about having an interesting take on a single topic or issue. Start there. And, even after you start putting your thoughts together on what you perceived as narrow in the first place, go ahead and try to trim some fat. You’ll be able to narrow your focus and make your article even more poignant. Remember: the reader won’t remember if your article was too short, but he or she will remember if it strayed off topic.
  • Right-size and know targets. You can always zero in on your audience better than you know them right now. High likelihood: Whatever category you put them in today, there is a smaller subset that provides a clearer, more-informed perspective. Go small to go big – the tighter the size of your group, the more upside for positive results.
  • Align succinct messages. First, understand that your themes need to be business-oriented. Because you are not selling products but instead positioning thinking, your messaging needs to make the business case … tightly, clearly and on the mark.
  • Back up. Don’t retreat. Back up your points of view. You have several methods – facts, research, best practices … all of the above. OK, you have gone to the trouble to develop a point of view or protocol or observation. And you have developed tight messaging that conveys exactly what you want to say. Don’t leave it hanging out there without any support. Reinforce it to drive it home.
  • Timeliness/Relevancy. So, your POV is really very interesting to you, but will it be to potential targets? Timeliness and relevancy at least give it a fighting chance. And by timeliness, current and future are far more compelling than hearing about how you solved something in the past. As for relevancy: we’ve already tightened up your audience focus, right? Is the subject matter spot-on for that very specific group
  • Patterns/Trends/Commonalities. If you don’t find yourself using one of these words – or a reasonable synonym – in the first two paragraphs of your article, you probably should close the file, call timeout and rethink what you are doing. One-offs aren’t the stuff.
  • Restraint.  Seems like we shouldn’t have to include this one, but … control yourself – stay away from what you don’t know. Do you really have experience with the area you are discussing? Or, are you stretching? (If you find your article is filling up with Hamburger Helper, your answer to the second question probably is “yes.”)
  • Sticky links. Granted, you aren’t running a commercial or an ad. However, there does need to be a stickiness or linkage – or, better yet, a “sticky linkage” – between what you do, how you do it and the solutions your clients will need in the future.
  • C-Squared. Deliver consistently and consistency. When effective, thought-leadership pieces are issued on a regular basis and readers look for them on at least an ad hoc schedule. Likewise, when effective, the quality level – irrespective of author or topic – remains at the same high mark that comes to be associated with the campaign.

If your thought-leading program is heading in the right direction, most of these keys take care of themselves. But, it’s always worth running through the list. Your want to deliver an effective program and the right approach can get you the desired results.

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A New Use for “The No Asshole Rule”

nbc-fires-donald-trump-after-he-calls-mexicans-rapists-and-drug-runnersNine years ago, Bob Sutton, a professor at Stanford University, published a book, The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t.  The premise was pretty straightforward: don’t hire/surround yourself with assholes but, if you do, here’s how to survive.

As we move into the general election season, it’s a read that is well worth revisiting.  While his observations go to corporate and organization settings, it doesn’t take much effort on the part of the concerned reader to apply them to the 2016 presidential election.

So, without any additional setup, let’s revisit his work …

Sutton starts with a given: assholes typically are bad for other employees who work for and with them, and for the company or organization that enables them to exist.  Yep.  What makes him great, however, is his position that yeah, sure, sometimes assholes even are successful – but life is too valuable and too short to put up with them.

(By the way, Sutton has written several other books and his blog, which makes for a fun and informative read, is at bobsutton.typepad.com/…)

Sutton also puts forth two tests to determine if that person in question is an asshole:

•     Do people feel oppressed, humiliated, de-energized, or belittled by the person in question? In particular, does he make them feel worse about themselves?

•     Does the person aim his or her venom at people who are less powerful and not at those who are more powerful?

Now, to be sure, Sutton recognizes that everyone acts in these ways from time to time.  But he asserts that “certified assholes” have a different pattern.

“A person needs to display a persistent pattern, to have a history of episodes that end with one ‘target’ after another feeling belittled, put down, humiliated, disrespected, oppressed, de-energized, and generally worse about themselves,” he writes.  “Psychologists make the distinction between states (fleeting feelings, thoughts, and actions) and traits (enduring personality characteristics) by looking for consistency across places and times – if someone consistently takes actions that leave a trail of victims in their wake, they deserve to be branded as certified assholes.”

Or, perhaps, in this presidential year, as a “branded” asshole.

Sutton also says there are a dozen everyday actions that assholes utilize.  A few of them are worth citing.

  • Personal insults
  • Invading one’s “personal territory”
  • Threats and intimidation, both verbal and nonverbal
  • “Sarcastic jokes” and “teasing” used as insult delivery systems
  • Withering e-mail flames
  • Status slaps intended to humiliate their victims
  • Public shaming or “status degradation” rituals
  • Rude interruptions
  • Dirty looks
  • Treating people as if they are invisible

Sounds like we just revisited the primary season.  But don’t despair.  Although Sutton doesn’t believe assholes always are avoidable, or can be eradicated, he does offer a survival guide of sorts to help us cope.  A couple of his tips follow.

  • Reframing: Change How You See Things.  “Learning when and how to simply not give a damn isn’t the kind of advice you hear in most business books, but it can help you make the most of a lousy situation,” he writes.
  • Develop Indifference and Emotional Detachment.  Sutton writes: “Passion is an overrated virtue …, and indifference is an underrated virtue.  As Walt Whitman said, ‘Detach whatever insults your soul.’  I think this is a lovely, compact summary or the virtues of developing indifference to demeaning jerks in the workplace, or anywhere else for that matter.”
  • Look for Small Wins.  “If you can’t win the big war against the creeps, start looking for small battles that you can win, as the sense of control you gain will sustain your spirit,” Sutton advises.  “And if one minor victory after another begins to pile up, who knows – you might start a movement … where the pro asshole rule is slowly but surely replaced by the no asshole rule.”

And I’ll add a final one.  If you are writing about an asshole, don’t actually type out his name.

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